STOP & THINK

A joint campaign by Queensland Police Service, Gel Blaster Retailers, Importers & the Gelball Community.

S – Safety aspects of possessing a Gel Blaster

  • Safety glasses and full-length clothing should be worn when firing a Gel Blaster.
  • If possible, those using a Gel Blaster should use designated event fields for activities
  • Advise your neighbors when using a Gel Blaster on private property. People seeing a Gel Blaster and not knowing it is not a real firearm can become alarmed and will contact police.
  • Permission should always be sought from another person when discharging a Gel Blaster at them
  • Modifying Gel Blasters giving it the capacity to fire a gel ball at a rate faster than its manufactured specifications

T – The Legislation relevant to Gel Blasters

  • It is NOT an offence to import / possess or use a Gel Blaster in QLD
  • There are no age restrictions on possessing a Gel Blaster in QLD.
  • There are no legal restrictions on the storage of Gel Blasters in QLD.
  • The sale, possession and use of Gel Blasters is unregulated and unmonitored in QLD.
  • It is an offence to modify a Gel Blaster if it has the capacity to fire ammunition as defined in the Explosive Regulations 2017
  • You do not need a weapons licence to possess a Gel Blaster. Gel Blasters are not a category of weapon under the Weapons Categories Regulations 1997.
  • You cannot use a Gel Blaster on a Paint Pellet shooting gallery when Paint Balls are in use.
  • You are not authorised to possess a Gel Blaster in any other State or Territory other than Queensland and South Australian. Each region possesses its own policies relevant to Gel Blasters.

O – Offences for misusing a Gel Blaster

Being in a public place and misusing a Gel Blaster

  • You could be charged with Section 6(2), ‘Commit Public Nuisance’ from Summary Offences Act 2005
  • You could be charged with Section 57(2), ‘Particular conduct involving a weapon in a public place prohibited’ from Weapons Act 1990
  • You could be charged with Section 58(2), ‘Dangerous conduct with weapon prohibited generally’ from Weapons Act 1990

Unlawfully entering onto someone else’s land to use a Gel Blasters 

  • You could be charged with Section 11, ‘Trespass’ from Summary Offences Act 2005

Using a Gel Blaster on another person without permission and causing them injury

  • You could be charged with Section 15(2), ‘Possession of implement in relation to particular offences’ from Summary Offences Act 2005
  • You could be charged with Section 339(1), ‘Assault Occasioning Bodily Harm’ from Criminal Code
  • You could be charged with Section 320(1), ‘Grievous Bodily Harm’ from Criminal Code

Shooting animals with a Gel Blaster

  • You could be charged with Section 18(2), ‘Animal Cruelty prohibited’ from Animal Care and Protection Act 2001

Causing fear by publicly showcasing a Gel Blaster

  • You could be charged with Section 69(1), ‘Going armed to cause fear’ from the Criminal Code

Threatening violence towards someone whilst using a Gel Blaster

  • You could be charged with Section 75, ‘Threatening Violence – Discharge firearms’ from Criminal Code

Pointing a Gel Blaster at another person who believes the toy is a real weapon

  • You could be charged with Section 335(1), ‘Common Assault’ from Criminal Code

Taking property from someone whilst using a Gel Blaster

  • You could be charged with Section 411(1), ‘Robbery’ from Criminal Code
  • You could be charged with Section 419(1), ‘Enter Dwelling and Commit an Indictable Offence’ from Criminal Code

P – Penalties for misusing a Gel Blaster

  • Section 6(2), from Summary Offences Act 2005 – If found guilty you may be required to pay 10 penalty units or receive 6 months imprisonment.
  • Section 11(2), from Summary Offences Act 2005 – If found guilty you may be required to pay 20 penalty units or receive 1 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 15(2), from Summary Offences Act 2005 – If found guilty you may be required to pay 20 penalty units or receive 1 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 18(2), from Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 – If found guilty you may be required to pay 2000 penalty units or receive 3 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 57(2), from Weapons Act 1990 – If found guilty you may be required to pay 40 penalty units or receive 6 months imprisonment.
  • Section 58(2), from Weapons Act 1990 – If found guilty you may be required to pay 200 penalty units or receive 4 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 69(1), from the Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 2 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 75, ‘Threatening Violence – Discharge firearms’ from Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 2 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 320(1), ‘Grievous Bodily Harm’ from Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 14 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 335(1), ‘Common Assault’ from Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 3 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 339(1), ‘Assault Occasioning Bodily Harm’ from Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 7 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 411(1), ‘Robbery’ from Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 14 year’s imprisonment.
  • Section 419(1), ‘Enter Dwelling and Commit an Indictable Offence’ from Criminal Code – If found guilty you may receive 14 year’s imprisonment.